Malaysian/Singaporen Hokkien foreign malay words

Discussions on the Hokkien (Minnan) language.
xng
Posts: 386
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:19 pm

Re: Malaysian/Singaporen Hokkien foreign malay words

Postby xng » Sat Feb 13, 2016 2:56 pm

The other thing I want to point out is the Malay word 'mana'.

Mana uh... In Malay 'mana ada'.

Actually, the correct word is 'Na uh...' 哪有

Remove the 'ma' from mana.

xng
Posts: 386
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:19 pm

Re: Malaysian/Singaporen Hokkien foreign malay words

Postby xng » Thu Feb 18, 2016 6:02 pm

Ah-bin wrote:Looks like you're back from cutting and pasting to the China History Forum......

xng wrote (dec 23 2010):

The northerners create 'Lang' character because that's how it sounds to them with a 人農 sound but that's not the original character. At that time in middle chinese, the sound has changed to 'Yin'. The original character is a simple 人, that's how 'man' was written 5000 years ago.


You made this up, just admit it for goodness sake. You make up stories about things to prove your point, and never ever admit that you are wrong about anything.

Even malaysian cantonese uses 'lui' but if you were to go to china guangdong province, NONE of the natives there know what 'lui' is.


Rubbish, they do, they just have a different meaning for it. Copper coin. I never said it didn't come from Malay. So you are lying if you imply that I did.


Dear obnoxious AhBin

1. You really don't know the difference between Hokkien colloquail and literary sound, do you? Colloquail is the sound closer to Old Chinese. Colloquail is 'lang' and literary is 'lin'. Lin is closer to Middle Chinese 'Yin'.

Why would ancient people create another new character for 人 when there is already a very ancient character for it. Just because it has changed sound, doesn't mean the original character is not 人 .

Or do you think that all Chinese characters in Hokkien have only one sound?

2. Really? I went there many times and nobody there knows what is 'lui'. Only those who has Malaysian friends know what is 'lui'. Eg. Alan Tam, the singer only say 'lui' when he is in Malaysia but when he goes back to HK, he say 'chin'.

3. Copper coin is called 'Thung Chin' 銅錢, Thung means copper. Chin means money. Just the 'lui' part doesn't mean copper coin, the most important character is still 'thung' 銅 . :mrgreen:
Last edited by xng on Thu Feb 18, 2016 6:40 pm, edited 4 times in total.

xng
Posts: 386
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:19 pm

Re: Malaysian/Singaporen Hokkien foreign malay words

Postby xng » Thu Feb 18, 2016 6:11 pm

Ah-bin wrote:Xng wrote

食風 is NOT borrowed from Malay, rather the malay borrowed from chinese. cantonese also use 'sik fung'.

http://www.cantonese.sheik.co.uk/dictionary/characters/152/?full=true


Care to click on the little link to the full entry? Or did you just hope we would miss it?

http://www.cantonese.sheik.co.uk/dictionary/words/15681/

Little writing underneath says:
[2] calque from Malay "Makan Angin"

Another one of xng's greatest hits! Ah, you do make or lives so interesting!


Dear obnoxious Ahbin

1. That Cantonese forum can be edited by anyone. You could have put it there yourself.

I myself have found some errors in that online dictionary in the past although the majority are correct.

2. However, I do agree that this requires further research but you don't have to be so arrogant and rude to other members unless you want the same treatment from me.

Formal Indonesia Malay word is liburan and not makan angin. By the way, Malay language originated from Sumatra so why is makan angin not spoken there? :mrgreen:

I will ask my Indonesian Sumatra friends later as to the informal Malay word for 'go for vacation'.

See below for a more valid argument.
Last edited by xng on Thu Feb 18, 2016 6:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.

xng
Posts: 386
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:19 pm

Re: Malaysian/Singaporen Hokkien foreign malay words

Postby xng » Thu Feb 18, 2016 6:54 pm

Yeleixingfeng wrote:... Okay.....

Xng, since you are back...

I must admit, I was quite disappointed when you said 食風 in the sense of travelling is Sintic. 吃西北風 itself evidently proves that the concept of wind-eating originally registered on a negative connotation. Much like how Bees are symbols of diligence; lotus are symbols of purity.. Wind-eating indirectly depicts how someone is so poor that he can only eat "wind".

Anyway, I'm sure you know that...



1. You have a point there. Come to think of it, I've never heard of any HK people say 'sik fung'.


2. This is another one of those difficult origin like 'duit' .Whether it originated from Malay or a native Hokkien word.


Thanks for pointing out to me. I'll report back after I've done my research.

xng
Posts: 386
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:19 pm

Re: Malaysian/Singaporen Hokkien foreign malay words

Postby xng » Thu Mar 03, 2016 2:00 pm

You guys might be interested to watch the 'Axian special trip to Jinmen 金門'.

It seems that some of the locals there also use 'pasar' and 'lui'.

The explanation from the local guide (not me!) was that these words are imported from Nanyang (SEA) Chinese and are Malay words.

This is the famous 'Axian' show where he visits many food stalls in Malaysia.

xng
Posts: 386
Joined: Sun Aug 09, 2009 2:19 pm

Re: Malaysian/Singaporen Hokkien foreign malay words

Postby xng » Thu Mar 03, 2016 2:05 pm

Regarding 'sik fung', it it certainly Malaysian Cantonese.

Wonder how it got into the vocabulary and what is the exact origin.

In China, Cantonese use 'lui yau' or 'dau fung'.


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